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The Cross Divides the Saved and Lost by God’s Power

A comparison of the verses from the LXX and Paul’s letter reveal their similarities.

1 Corinthians 1:19

Ἀπολῶ τὴν σοφίαν τῶν σοφῶν

καὶ τὴν σύνεσιν τῶν συνετῶν ἀθετήσω

Isa. 29:14b

Ἀπολῶ τὴν σοφίαν τῶν σοφῶν

καὶ τὴν σύνεσιν τῶν συνετῶν κρύψω

Identical vocabulary has been underlined

Interestingly, the apostle amends the final word of the passage from ἀθετήσω to κρύψω. Harm-Jan Inklaar notes, “by using ἀθετήσω the text points out that something definitive has happened that overrules the authorities of the age.”[11] The apostle sarcastically depreciated the value that the Greeks placed upon wisdom as he developed this comparison conveying the point that in both circumstances, humans exalted “godless thinking.”[12] In addition, he followed a method similar to certain OT passages. For instance, several times, the OT knitted σοφίᾳ and σύνεσι in a joint arrangement.[13] Both Exodus 31:3 and Deuteronomy 4:6 employed wisdom and prudence within their respective contexts in the manner that he noticed the two virtues as functioning. H.H. Williams writes, “the wisdom that is being judged in Isa. 29:14 is human wisdom and understanding that does not include God’s revelation.”[14] The Isaiah text establishes why Paul rebuffs the σοφίᾳ λόγου , rather preaching the λόγος of the cross. Therefore, God resided above humankind’s highest wisdom and prudence.

 

PR

This excerpt from The Wisdom of the Cross and the Power of the Spirit in the Corinthian Church: Grounding Pneumatic Experiences and Renewal Studies in the Cross of Christ (Pickwick, 2018) is used with permission.

 

Read the third excerpt from The Wisdom of the Cross and the Power of the Spirit in the Corinthian Church.

Healing and Salvation in the Cross of Christ

 

Further Reading

https://twitter.com/WisdomofCross

 

Publisher’s Page: https://wipfandstock.com/the-wisdom-of-the-cross-and-the-power-of-the-spirit-in-the-corinthian-church.html

 

Preview: https://books.google.com/books?id=qCB0DwAAQBAJ

 

Notes

[1] Mihaila, The Paul-Apollos Relationship and Paul’s Stance Toward Greco-Roman Rhetoric: An Exegetical and Socio-Historical Study of 1 Corinthians 1–4, 18.

[2] Roy Ciampa and Brian Rosner, The First Epistle to the Corinthians: Pillar New Testament Commentary [PNTC] (Grand Rapids, MI: Eerdmans, 2010), 91.

[3] Anthony C. Thiselton, First Corinthians: A Shorter Exegetical and Pastoral Commentary

(Grand Rapids, MI: Eerdmans 2006), 45.

[4] Gräbe, The Power of God in Paul’s Letters, 240.

[5] Walter Grundmann, “δύναμις, κτλ,” in Theological Dictionary of the New Testament, eds. Gerhard Kittel and Gerhard Friedrich, trans. and ed. Geoffrey W. Bromiley, Vol. 2 (Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 1968), 284.

[6] Ibid., 309.

[7] Gräbe, The Power of God in Paul’s Letters, 239.

[8] Barrett, A Commentary on the First Epistle to the Corinthians. Harper’s New Testament Commentary, 52.

[9] Gordon Fee, The First Epistle to the Corinthians. The New International Commentary on the

New Testament (Grand Rapids, MI: Eerdmans, 1987), 73.

[10] Ciampa and Rosner, The First Epistle to the Corinthians: Pillar New Testament Commentary, 93.

[11] Harm-Jan Inkelaar, Conflict over Wisdom: The Theme of 1 Corinthians 1–4 Rooted in Scripture (CBET 63; Leuven: Peeters, 2011): 199.

[12] John Ruef, Paul’s First Letter to Corinth (Middlesex, England: Penguin Books, 1971), 12.

[13] Marvin Vincent, Word Studies in the New Testament (New York, NY: Charles Scribner’s Sons, 1919), 191.

[14] Williams, H.H. Drake, ed. The Wisdom of the Wise: The Presence and Function of Scripture within 1 Cor. 1: 18-3:23 Vol. 49. (Leiden: Brill, 2001), 57.

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Category: In Depth, Winter 2019

About the Author: Cletus L. Hull, III, M.Div. (Trinity Episcopal School for Ministry), D.Min. (Fuller Theological Seminary), Ph.D. (Regent University), has served as a pastor with the Christian Church (Disciples of Christ) for 32 years and psychiatric chaplain for 30 years. He teaches courses in New Testament at Biblical Life Institute in Freeport, Pennsylvania. He has researched the growing Disciples of Christ churches in Puerto Rico and has an interest in the significance of the Stone-Campbell churches in American Christianity. His article, "My Church is a Mental Hospital" appeared in the Summer 2015 issue of Healing Line. He is the author of The Wisdom of the Cross and the Power of the Spirit in the Corinthian Church: Grounding Pneumatic Experiences and Renewal Studies in the Cross of Christ (Pickwick, 2018). Twitter: @cletus_hull, Facebook, www.CletusHull.com

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