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The Charismatic Renewal

By that time other Christian publishers were doing Pentecostal/charismatic writers regularly. Steve Strang picked up the mantle (and the readership) of Logos Journal with his magazine Charisma, which has remained the banner publication of American charismatics to this day. After bankruptcy, Logos eventually emerged under new management as “Bridge-Logos” and continued to publish charismatic titles, though at a much reduced rate.

With the Charismatic Renewal, and with such persons such as Dennis Bennett, Harald Bredesen and Francis MacNutt in leadership positions, it became difficult to consign tongues and the other gifts as delusions of the poor, fanatical and ignorant underclass. In an important sense, the Charismatic Renewal helped make Pentecostalism respectable to mainline Christians.[35] Partly because the Charismatic Renewal was a “middle class” Pentecostalism, and partly due also to the Charismatic Renewal’s separation from the classic Holiness/Pentecostal legalism, the growth of charismatic churches and influence during the 1970s was astounding.

Significantly, the doctrine that tongues was a necessary “initial evidence” for the Baptism of in the Spirit was challenged as many Christians began experiencing the Gifts of the Spirit during the Charismatic Renewal without tongues. They could turn to 1 Cor. 12: 7-11 which shows that Paul believed that individual believers experience some, but not all of the gifts of the Spirit. The focus of the Charismatic Renewal shifted from tongues to healing and worship as the main elements of Spirit-filled life. But at the end, the most important thing the Renewal accomplished was that it made Pentecostalism, and all the Gift of the Spirit respectable and an option for millions of Christians who would not directly go to a Pentecostal, “Holy Roller” church.

 

PR

 

Further study:

This recording, from about 1985, shows the Rev. Bennett explaining his unexpected entrance into the Spirit-filled life. http://www.charismamag.com/anniversary/greetings-from-friends-of-charisma/24021-watch-charismatic-movement-finds-episcopalian-priest-dennis-bennett

 

Notes

[1] There are now fine studies of the Charismatic movement from various perspectives, among the best are Peter Hocken’s, The Glory and the Shame: Reflections on the 20th Century Outpouring of the Holy Spirit (Gilford: Eagle, 1994) and the more recent work by Vinson Synan, An Eyewitness Remembers the Century of the Holy Spirit (Grand Rapids: Chosen, 2101). Both authors played significant roles in the renewal, with Dr. Synan being perhaps one of most important facilitators of the renewal. [Editor’s note: Read William De Arteaga’s 2001 review of Hocken’s The Glory and the Shame. Read John Miller’s review of Synan’s An Eyewitness Remembers the Century of the Holy Spirit.]

[2] I have given details of both the CFO and Agnes Sanford’s Schools of pastoral Care in my work, Agnes Sanford and Her Companions: The Assault on Cessationism and the Coming of the Charismatic Renewal (Eugene: Wipf & Stock, 2015) chapters 14 and 18.

[3] On the pivotal importance of Rufus Moseley, see my Agnes Sanford, chapter 14.

[4] See his autobiography, Harald Bredesen (“With Pat King”), Yes, Lord! (Plainfield: Logos International, 1972).

[5]Bennett’s account of the beginnings of the charismatic renewal in his church is a classic of charismatic literature: Nine O’clock in the Morning (Plainsfield: Bridge-Logos, 1970). For an excellent overview of the Charismatic Renewal in the Episcopal Church see: Dr. William Faupel, “Touched by the Wind: The Charismatic Movement in the Episcopal Church,” Pneuma Review, posted 8/20/2000.

[6] Bennett, Nine O’clock, 75

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Category: Church History, Summer 2016

About the Author: William L. De Arteaga, Ph.D., is known internationally as a Christian historian and expert on revivals and the rebirth and renewal of the Christian healing movement. His major works include Quenching the Spirit: Discover the Real Spirit Behind the Charismatic Controversy (Creation House, 1992, 1996), Forgotten Power: The Significance of the Lord’s Supper in Revival (Zondervan, 2002), Agnes Sanford and Her Companions: The Assault on Cessationism and the Coming of the Charismatic Renewal (Wipf & Stock, 2015), and The Public Prayer Station: Taking Healing Prayer to the Streets and Evangelizing the Nones (Emeth Press, 2018). Bill pastored two Hispanic Anglican congregations in the Marietta, Georgia area, and is semi-retired. He continues in his healing, teaching and writing ministry and is the state chaplain of the Order of St. Luke, encouraging the ministry of healing in all Christian denominations. Facebook

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