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The Secret Codes in Matthew: Examining Israel’s Messiah, Part 8: Matthew 11-12, by Kevin M. Williams

Understandably, not every commentary or seminary holds this point of view. In fact, there appears to have been a great deal of debate of the meaning of Yeshua’s statement regarding blasphemy against the Holy Spirit over the centuries, and there are a variety of interpretations.

Yet the predominant context of Matthew 12 has been about how religious leaders have perverted biblical justice, abolished God’s Torah in favor of their own, turned a blind eye toward compassion, and preferred religiosity over the needs of their fellow man. Unless Yeshua and Matthew have both inserted a total non sequitur—with the intent of confusing the reader—the notion of blaspheming the Holy Spirit seems to fit the context specified. Is it possible therefore, that if we permit perverted justice, behaving as the Pharisees did, that we blaspheme the Holy Spirit?

Yeshua’s words then, and now, should have a profound affect on us all: “And I say to you, that every careless word that men shall speak, they shall render account for it in the day of judgment. For by your words you shall be justified, and by your words you shall be condemned” (Matthew 12:36-37).

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Then some of the scribes and Pharisees answered Him, saying, “Teacher, we want to see a sign from You” (Matthew 12:38).

Unless this was a different day, under different circumstances, one must wonder why the Pharisees and scribes would ask such an inane question. Did they not see the withered hand restored in their own synagogue? Did they not witness the people following Yeshua and being healed? It may appear that they were baiting Him, or perhaps they were like us, always chasing after the next confirming sign because our faith can be so weak.

Yet Yeshua’s answer is the same as it has been. He tells them that He is the Messiah: “behold, something greater than Solomon is here” (Matthew 12:42). So far He has told them that something greater than the temple is in their midst, someone who is Lord of the Sabbath has arrived, someone greater than David is near, that the kingdom of God is upon them, and now, that someone greater than Solomon is among them. He has yet to say “I am the Messiah,” but to those with listening ears, they heard! Nothing yet would stand up in the religious court of the temple, but the message could not be clearer.

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Next Issue: “Yeshua the Parable Preacher”

The parables carry relatively simple messages, yet might there be something deeper?

 

Endnotes
1 Yeshua is the Hebrew form of the name “Jesus” and is used throughout.
2 David H. Stern, Jewish New Testament Commentary (Clarksville, MD: Jewish New Testament Publications, 1992).
3 Daniel Juster, Due Process (Destiny Image Publishers, 1992).

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Category: Biblical Studies, Pneuma Review, Winter 2003

About the Author: Kevin M. Williams, Litt.D., H.L.D. has served in Messianic ministries since 1987 and has written numerous articles and been a featured speaker at regional and international conferences on Messianic Judaism.

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